• 英语 杨浦区2017年高三第二次模拟考试
补全信息 本大题共10小题,每小题undefined分,共NaN分。把答案填写在题中横线上。
1

Delivering Food by Drone

A Singapore restaurant plans to use drones (遥控飞机) to transport food and drinks from the kitchen to a wait station near customers’ tables.

Infinium Robotics, the Singapore company that’s developing the drones for restaurant chain Timbre, has spent the past two weeks testing the technology at the restaurant before it opens each night1 businessand hopes to have it in place by the end of the year.

But how does the drone knowwhere to hover (盘旋)? What if someone bumps into the drone or is standing inits way? “There’s no chance at all  2  it will hit anything,” says Infinium Roboticschief executive Junyang Woon.

The drones automatically chargewhile  3  (wait) in the kitchen.   4 the chef puts an order on the drone, hehits a button on a keypad and the drone automatically flies to one of two waitstations. Sense-and-avoid technology 5  (build) into the drone won’t allow it to landat the wait station if anything is in its way. The drones are equipped with sonar (声纳系统) and an infraredsensor (红外线传感器), too.

A waiter then removes the foodor drink from the drone and hits a button   6  sends it back to the kitchen. The drones,weighing a little over five pounds,  7 carry just over four pounds of food.Infinium Robotics is working on a model that will carry twice as  8(much) food.

“Its job is to help the waitersto reduce some of their boring tasks, ” Woon said. “If they let the robots  9 (do) the job, they can concentrate oninteracting with customers to bring about higher customer satisfaction anddining experience.”

Since it drew recent media attention,Woon  10 (hear) from resorts andrestaurants in 10 countries, including the United States.

【语篇导读】:本文是一篇说明文讲述了一家餐厅计划用遥控飞机送餐的事,以及对遥控飞机送餐的具体介绍。

Afor

Bthat

Cwaiting

DAfter

Ebuilt

F that/which

Gcan   

much

do

has heard

分值: 15分 查看题目解析 >
补全信息 本大题共10小题,每小题undefined分,共NaN分。把答案填写在题中横线上。
1

FDA OKs Genetically Modified Salmon for Human Consumption

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Thursday approved genetically modified salmon (转基因的三文鱼), the first such altered animal allowed for human consumption in the United States.

The government had tried to   11   approving the fast-growing salmon for more than five years due to consumer concerns about eating genetically modified foods. But the agency said Thursday the fish is safe to eat.

In announcing the approval, the FDA said that there are “no biologically  12  differences in the nutrition of AquAdvantage Salmon compared to that of other farm-raised Atlantic salmon.”

AquAdvantage Salmon was created by the Massachusetts-based company AquaBounty. Ron Stotish, the company’s CEO, said in a statement that the fish is a “game changer that brings healthy and nutritious food to consumers in an environmentally   13   manner without damaging the ocean and other marine habitats.”

The fish grows twice as fast as normal salmon, so it reaches   14   size more quickly. It has an added growth hormone (激素) from the Pacific Chinook salmon that allows the fish to produce growth hormone all year long. The engineers were able to   15   the hormone active by using another gene from an ocean pout (a kind of fish) that acts like an “on”  16   for the hormone. Typical Atlantic salmon produce the growth hormone for only part of the year.

There is no evidence that the foods would be unsafe, but for some people, it’s an ethical (伦理的)17 . Some people have promised not to sell the salmon, andit’s still unclear whether the public will 18  an appetite forthe fish if it is approved. Genetic engineering is already widely used forcrops, but the government until now has not considered allowing the consumptionof modified animals. Although the potential benefits and profits are huge, manypeople have doubts about controlling the genetic  19   of other living creatures.

Critics worry that it couldcause human allergies (过敏) and the eventual extinction of the   20  salmon population if it escapes and breeds in the wild.

 

【语篇导读】:本文引出食物药监局对转基因三文鱼表示赞同开头,介绍了转基因三文鱼的特点和优缺点。

Akeep

Bmarket

Cissue

Dperspective

Erelevant

Favoid

Gdevelop

switch

natural

responsible

code

分值: 20分 查看题目解析 >
补全信息 本大题共4小题,每小题2分,共8分。把答案填写在题中横线上。
1

School That Can Educate Us All

Christos Porios, 16, lives in a small Greek city. “My mother’s a teacher and my father’s a mechanic,” he explains, adding that neither is knowledgeable about computers — especially compared with him.    47

Porios was taking a free class in machine learning offered by Andrew Ng, a professor at Stanford University, over an online platform Ng developed with his colleagues. Drawing on what he learned, Porios was able to participate in the International Space Apps Challenge, a virtual hackathon (编程马拉松) using data from NASA and other government agencies.

If one teenager in one small city can become a genius hacker through an online course, does it mean the world has changed? We have been hearing about the potential of online education for decades.

48    A number of online education platforms have appeared, featuring professors from top universities offering free courses.

49    Ng was amazed. “It would take me 250 years to teach this many people at Stanford,” he says. And so, just one month into the course, Ng and his Stanford colleague, Daphne Koller, decided to leave their faculty posts (教职) and dive into online teaching full-time. In April, they launched their company, Coursera, with a $16 million round of venture funding. So far, it has managed to team up with 35 colleges in nine countries.

To Ng and Koller, Coursera’s mission is simple and yet grand. That is to teach millions of people around the world for free, while also transforming higher education.

According to Ng, the world’s top 20 universities enroll only about 200,000 students. There are million more who could participate in classwork at the higher level, but most of them are far from any of the leading universities.    50

Koller says Coursera’s total registration has hit 15 million. Porios, the young Greek, is only one of those registrants. His hope is to study in Germany or England someday. He is even toying with the idea of taking classes at MIT or Stanford — but this time in person.

【语篇导读】说明文。大学生涯。

AFinally, it has taken a giant leap forward.

BAll of the factors pushing online education toward the mainstream of higher education are now crashing together.

COver the past few years, he has been teaching himself programming.

DIn other words, Coursera’s approach is a long way from a simple online video lecture.

EYet the most exciting promise of their company and the like is the role they might play in improving education for the poor around the world.

FNg’s course in machine learning attracted 104,000enrollees around the world.

分值: 8分 查看题目解析 >
完型填空 本大题共15小题,每小题 1.00分,共15分。
1

More Parents Shifting Careers to Achieve Work-life Balance

As a television news host, Cynthia Demos’ schedule made her home life a challenge. Working nights and weekends meant she rarely put her 3-year-old son and 5-year-old daughter to bed, or spent Saturdays at the park. So, three years ago, Demos began testing the waters to see if operating her own business making marketing videos would create an option for more  21   time.

Last month, Demos took a leap. Instead of renegotiating her   22 , she left her job to take her venture to the next level — building her own video production/media training company. It’s a career shift on a path to work-life balance that more  23 are making.

New research shows the top reason why people leave their jobs is to  24  opportunities with a better work-life balance. Those who make the   25  say there almost always is a main cause, either work- or home-related. It could be a life-changing event like the birth of a child, or it could be a new demanding boss, change in job responsibilities, or too many missed milestone events. It might even be a more  26   job offer.

For Denie Harris, the main cause was the attraction of a better   27  situation for a mom with young daughters. Harris had been marketing director for two companies in South Florida when an opportunity came her way to hold a similar position at her daughters’ school. It was a decision that required   28   all factors. The upside included seeing her children during the workday and sharing the same   29  with them. The downside was leaving the corporate world and earning less. “Everything in life is a give-and-take,” Harris says. “For a mom, working at your children’s school is the best possible place to be.”

In the   30  to achieve work-life balance, working mothers having been “quitting” jobs for more than a decade, choosing to stay at home with their children when  31   possible. But today, both men and women are making job changes, choosing work options that better fit their   32  lifestyle. The shift often means serious consideration of   33  , including salary, advancement and fulfillment.

Doug Bartel, who left his job as a TV news producer more than a decade ago, says that what working fathers often look for is predictability and control over their schedules. They are starting their own law firms or becoming self-employed consultants to gain that   34  .

Big salaries aren’t necessarily the golden handcuffs (手铐) they used to be. With the traditional 40-hour workweek becoming out of date, a survey of nearly 9,700 full-time workers by the global firm of Ernst & Young found that most parents are willing to make  35 and financial concessions (让步) for work-life balance.

【语篇导读】:很多人为了减轻工作负担而换工作,讲述了其中的具体原因,和人们现代的想法。

21.

Abalance

Bbusiness

Cfamily

Dentertainment

22.

Aissue

Bcontract

Cfuture

Dcontribution

23.

Aemployers

Bemployees

Cchildren

Dparents

24.

Agive up

Bseek out

Cact on

Dsubstitute for

25.

Achange

Bmistake

Cdifference

Deffort

26.

Abudget-friendly

Bfemale-friendly

Cfamily-friendly

Dbusiness-friendly

27.

Awork

Bliving

Csecurity

Deducation

28.

Aidentifying

Bunderstanding

Cdescribing

Dweighing

29.

Aidea

Bfeeling

Cvalue

Dschedule

30.

Astruggle

Bpermission

Cdecision

Dability

31.

Aphysically

Bmedically

Cfinancially

Dlogically

32.

Apast

Bdesired

Cinteresting

Dmodern

33.

Ajobs

Bhobbies

Csacrifices

Dpartners

34.

Apower

Bsupport

Cskill

Dcontrol

35.

Aidentity

Bcareer

Cmental

Dconsiderate

分值: 15分 查看题目解析 >
简答题(综合题) 本大题共32分。简答应写出文字说明、证明过程或演算步骤。
1

At first glance Esther Okade seems like a normal 10-year-old. She loves dressing up as Elsa from “Frozen”, playing with Barbie dolls and going to the park or shopping. But what makes the British-Nigerian youngster stand out is the fact that she’s also a university student.

Esther, from Walsall, an industrial town in the UK’s West Midlands region, is one of the country’s youngest college freshmen. The talented 10-year-old enrolled at the Open University in January and is already top of the class, having recently scored 100% in an exam.

“It’s so interesting and super easy,” she laughs. “My mum taught me in a nice way.” She adds: “I want to finish the course in two years. Then I’m going to do my PhD in financial maths when I’m 13. I want to have my own bank by the time I’m 15 because I like numbers and I like people and banking is a great way to help people.”

And in case people think her parents have pushed her into starting university early, Esther disagrees. “I actually wanted to start when I was seven. But my mum didn’t agree.” After three years of begging, Mother Efe finally agreed to explore the idea.

Esther has always jumped ahead of her peers. Her mother noticed her daughter’s gift for figures shortly after she began homeschooling her at the age of three. Initially, Esther’s parents had enrolled her in a private school but after a few short weeks, the usually-energetic youngster refused to go back to that school because the teachers didn’t let her talk in class. In the UK, education is not compulsory until five, so Efe started to do little things at home by teaching basic number skills but Esther was miles ahead. By four, her natural talent for maths had seen the eager student move on to algebra (代数学) and quadratic equations (二次方程式).

And Esther isn’t the only maths miracle in the family. Her younger brother Isaiah, 6, will soon be sitting his first A-level exam in June.

【语篇导读】本文是一篇记叙文,描述了Easter不同寻常的学习经历。

36. Which of the following makes Esther Okade different from her normal peers?(    )

AShe is the youngest college student in the UK.

BShe goes to university at a much earlier age.

CShe often gets full marks in maths exams.

DShe loves acting as a university student.

37. From the passage we can learn that _____.

AEsther thinks her parents expect too much of her

BEsther cannot adapt herself well to college life

CEsther asked to go to university even earlier

DEsther dislikes being taught at home

38. What might be a main factor that has led to Esther’s being a maths genius?(     )

AThe gene from her family.                    

BHer coursein the university.

CThe criticism from her teachers.

DHer mother’shomeschooling.

39. Esther can be described as a girl who _____.

Ais ambitious and has a clear goal            

Bis creativeand loves exploring the unknown

Cis rebellious but ready to help others

Dis energetic but reluctant to challenge herself

分值: 8分 查看题目解析 >
1

40. The above website is mainly designed for _____.

Achildren

Bteenagers

Cteachers

DBusinessmen

41. It can be inferred that the website is most probably initiated in(    )

AAmerica

BBritain

CAustralia

DCanada

42.Which of the following is true according to the website?(    )

AThe website is composed of twelve main sections.

BIndividuals and institutions pay the same price for a subscription.

CWe can access the website by various means except on Facebook.

DResources can be gained free for about one month after registration.

分值: 6分 查看题目解析 >
1

Unless you are like Nasty Gal’s founder Sophia Amoruso, the passwords you use to access your email and the endless other accounts you need for work aren’t filled with intention. With increasing security requirements, it’s likely your word/number combinations are becoming even less memorable. But new research suggests it may not be long before you won’t need to memorize passwords.

“Brainprint”, published in Neurocomputing, reveals that the brain’s reaction to certain words could be a unique identifying code — like a fingerprint — that could eventually replace passwords.

In a small experiment, the researchers measured the brains’ signals of 45 volunteers as they read through a list of 75 acronyms such as FBI and DVD. The word-recognition response differed so much between each participant that a second experiment using a computer program could identify each one with 94% accuracy.

It’s not enough to feel totally secure, but promising enough to hint at the future of securing sensitive information.

The advantage of using such a biometric system (生物识别系统) is that it can be used for continuous verification (验证), New Scientist points out. Passwords or fingerprints only provide a tool for one-off identification. Continuous verification could in theory allow someone to interact with many computer systems at the same time or even with a variety of intelligent objects, without having to repeatedly enter passwords for each device.

As Hollywood has illustrated, it’s simply a matter of cutting off a finger to steal that person’s identity. “Brainprints, on the other hand, are potentially cancellable,” said Sarah Laszlo, assistant professor of psychology and linguistics at Binghamton University and co-author of the study, “So, in the unlikely event that attackers were actually able to steal a brainprint from an authorized user, the authorized user could then ‘reset’ their brainprint.”

Until now, brain signals have been a challenge to understand. This experiment leaped over the obstacle by focusing on the brainwaves from the specific area that reads and recognizes words. The signal is therefore clearer and easier to measure.

The problem, so far, is that the brain signal is still not as accurate as scanning someone’s fingerprint, and initially requires sticking diodes (二极管) on your head in order to get a read. That’s ok, according to Zhanpeng Jin, assistant professor at Binghamton University and coauthor of the study, because brainprint isn’t going to be mass-produced any time soon. He says the researchers foresee its use at places such as the Pentagon, where the number of authorized users is small, and they don’t need to be continuously verified the way you do to access your mobile device or email.

Better keep your memory sharp, at least a little while longer.

【语篇导读】本文是一篇说明文,向我们详细描述了脑纹解锁,以及它的具体功能和操作。

43. In paragraph 5, “one-off identification” refers to the identification that _____.

Ahappens as part of a regular series

Binteracts with intelligent objects

Ccan be verified continuously

Dneeds repeated verification

44.According to Sarah Laszlo, _____.

Afingerprints can be canceled once stolen

Bbrainprints are theft-proof and resettable

Cattackers can steal and replace brainprints

Dusers have the authority to cancel brainprints

45.It can be inferred from the passage that _____.

Abrainprints will sharpen users’ memory

Bbrainprints will become easier to be measured

Cbrainprints will receive narrow application

Dbrainprints will eventually replace fingerprints

46. Which of the following is the best title of the passage?(   )

ABrainprints: A New Way to Replace Passwords

BBrainprints: A Unique Device to Identify Codes

CBrainprints: A Quicker Way to Access Your Email

DBrainprints: A Securer Device to Identify Brain Signals

分值: 8分 查看题目解析 >
1

Fun Offices Make Workers Happier?

In order to make their employees happier, companies around the world have been busy installing play equipment in the workplace. Table football, computer games and action figures have become common in some workplaces.

Despite all this effort, unfortunately, work still makes people unhappy. According to a study by the London School of Economics, the place where people feel most miserable is work.

To proceed with an emphasis on being happy, however, other emotions are crowded out. Anger, sadness, anxiety and uncertainty all become a no-no. Such a ban on negative emotions can be emotionally bad for employees. A number of studies have shown that being able to express a range of positive and negative emotions is important, particularly when people are dealing with difficult experiences.

Besides, being constantly on the lookout for happiness may actually drive happiness away from us. Scientists have found that when we talk about how important happiness is, we become less likely to find it, even when we have experiences that usually make us happy.

Wanting to be happy at work is fair enough, but being forced to be happy at work can be troubling. If companies were genuinely interested in making their employees happy, they would perhaps look at some more “down-to-earth” interventions (务实的干预). A simple step would be to stop interrupting workers with all sorts of pointless demands such as long emails and unnecessary forms. A study by Harvard Business School found workers felt most satisfied on days when they were able to focus on a piece of work and make meaningful progress on it.

In short, if companies really want to make their employees happier, they should think long and hard before pointless restructuring.

51.study shows work still upsets people though companies are trying to make workplaces fun. Forcing employees to be happy is useless because being unable to express negative feelings is harmful and always looking for happiness deliberately will make people less happy. Rather, the effective way to make employees happy is not to interrupt employees with meaningless tasks. (58 words)

分值: 10分 查看题目解析 >
翻译题 本大题共15分。
1

52.这只训练有素的警犬对任何声响都很警觉。(alert)

53.利用好图书馆无疑会对你的学习有益。(doubt)

54.新的交通法规规定,机动车在任何情况下都得避让行人。(way)

55.共享单车不仅使用方便,而且价格合理,为短途出行提供了一种额外选择。(Not only)

分值: 15分 查看题目解析 >
书面表达 本大题共25分。
1

某电视台计划推出一个新的电视综艺节目(variety programme),但为了更好地迎合观众的需求,该电视台向观众广泛征求意见。假设你是观众陈方,写一封电子邮件给该电视台的负责人王先生,表达你对新的电视综艺节目的建议,并陈述你的理由。邮件内容应包括:

  综艺节目的名字、针对的观众群体、主要内容及形式等;

  提出这些建议的理由。

注:邮件中不得提及你的真实姓名或学校。

分值: 25分 查看题目解析 >
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